Brochure Advertising – Murphy, NC

Come to EXIT Realty Mountain View Properties and pick up one of the brochures on our wall! Trying to find things to do here in Murphy? Just stop by and get a Cherokee County Map! If you are wanting to get your business’ name out, come by and give us some of your brochures and we will be glad to put them out in our office!

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FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate Tools and Solutions Contract Kathy Vetten and Corky Vetten, Realtors. Call us at our Office #828-837-2288 or Cell #828-361-0360 / 828-361-0358 or visit website: http://www.kathyvetten.com or http://www.exitmurphy.com or

http://www.cometomurphync.com

#EXITRealty #Murphync #RealEstate #CometoMurphyNC #BuyaHome #ListYourHome

#Realtors

Things To Do – Murphy, NC

Are you looking for something to do this week in Murphy, NC? EXIT Realty Mountain View Properties suggest to go out and maybe watch a movie in downtown at the Henn Theater, go bowling at Ultra-Star Bowling at the Harrah’s Casino, take your friends to a karaoke night at Chevelles 66, or even a Trivia Night at Shoebooties. Do something this week or any week to get you out and have fun! mic

For more information check out the Cherokee County CHamber of Commerce Event Calender : https://business.cherokeecountychamber.com/events/calendar/2020-01-01

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FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate Tools and Solutions Contract Kathy Vetten and Corky Vetten, Realtors. Call us at our Office #828-837-2288 or Cell #828-361-0360 / 828-361-0358 or visit website: http://www.kathyvetten.com or http://www.exitmurphy.com or

http://www.cometomurphync.com

#EXITRealty #Murphync #RealEstate #CometoMurphyNC #BuyaHome #ListYourHome

#Realtors

New Year’s Resolution – Murphy, NC

It’s a new year and another start of a new decade! Make year 2020 the year you follow through with your “New Year’s Resolution”! Having trouble finding some ideas to help better your life style for this decade? Here is a couple we at EXIT Realty Mountain View Properties have found to help you!2020

  1. Find a better budget – this means keep track of all your expense and watch what you spend your money on. A helpful tip is to ask yourself “Do I need this or do I just want it?”
  2. Find new recipes – Stop cooking the same old thing that you get tired of and find a recipe that is healthy and delicious!
  3. Join a Group – go out and join an activity to help your community or even join a club that you think you would enjoy! Try something new!
  4. Sanitize your phone WEEKLY – you probably think we are crazy suggesting this, but the reason you might be sick is because of all the germs you have collected on your cellphone. Gross!
  5. Exercise More – try new exercises each week, take the stairs, go walk/run instead of watching TV, be active!
  6. Keep Clean – it’s hard sometimes to keep your home clean (even your bedroom, ugh), but make a chore schedule and stick to it each week and you’ll have a nice and tidy home!
  7. Donate – go through your closets and donate clothes you don’t wear anymore. Take it to your local thrift store or to someone in need. You’ll feel great!
  8. Be Positive – You may be having a bad day, but just think to yourself all the blessings you have in life!
  9. Treat Yourself Every Once in a While – go get your nails done, go get a massage, take yourself out to eat, or go shopping.
  10. Stop Procrastinating – procrastination keeps you from doing your best, and makes you over whelmed. SO STOP! When you have a task to do take time, do it in intervals of time periods, this takes the stress away.

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FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate Tools and Solutions Contract Kathy Vetten and Corky Vetten, Realtors. Call us at our Office #828-837-2288 or Cell #828-361-0360 / 828-361-0358 or visit website: http://www.kathyvetten.com or http://www.exitmurphy.com or

http://www.cometomurphync.com

#EXITRealty #Murphync #RealEstate #CometoMurphyNC #BuyaHome #ListYourHome

#Realtors

FRIDAY 13th – Murphy, NC

EXIT Realty Mountain View Properties would like to wish you a happy Friday! In case you didn’t know, today is the 13th! We would like to give you a little history on how Friday the 13th’s are so “unlucky” and “spooky”. The History is presented by History.com .

“Long considered a harbinger of bad luck, Friday the 13th has inspired a late 19th-century secret society, an early 20th-century novel, a horror film franchise and not one but two unwieldy terms—paraskavedekatriaphobia and friggatriskaidekaphobia—that describe fear of this supposedly unlucky day.

The Fear of 13

Just like walking under a ladder, crossing paths with a black cat or breaking a mirror, many people hold fast to the belief that Friday the 13th brings bad luck. Though it’s uncertain exactly when this particular tradition began, negative superstitions have swirled around the number 13 for centuries.

While Western cultures have historically associated the number 12 with completeness (there are 12 days of Christmas, 12 months and zodiac signs, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 gods of Olympus and 12 tribes of Israel, just to name a few examples), its successor 13 has a long history as a sign of bad luck.

The ancient Code of Hammurabi, for example, reportedly omitted a 13th law from its list of legal rules. Though this was probably a clerical error, superstitious people sometimes point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations.

Fear of the number 13 has even earned a psychological term: triskaidekaphobia.

Why is Friday the 13th Unlucky?

According to biblical tradition, 13 guests attended the Last Supper, held on Maundy Thursday, including Jesus and his 12 apostles (one of whom, Judas, betrayed him). The next day, of course, was Good Friday, the day of Jesus’ crucifixion.

The seating arrangement at the Last Supper is believed to have given rise to a longstanding Christian superstition that having 13 guests at a table was a bad omen—specifically, that it was courting death.

Though Friday’s negative associations are weaker, some have suggested they also have roots in Christian tradition: Just as Jesus was crucified on a Friday, Friday was also said to be the day Eve gave Adam the fateful apple from the Tree of Knowledge, as well as the day Cain killed his brother, Abel.download

The Thirteen Club

In the late-19th century, a New Yorker named Captain William Fowler (1827-1897) sought to remove the enduring stigma surrounding the number 13—and particularly the unwritten rule about not having 13 guests at a dinner table—by founding an exclusive society called the Thirteen Club.

The group dined regularly on the 13th day of the month in room 13 of the Knickerbocker Cottage, a popular watering hole Fowler owned from 1863 to 1883. Before sitting down for a 13-course dinner, members would pass beneath a ladder and a banner reading “Morituri te Salutamus,” Latin for “Those of us who are about to die salute you.”

Four former U.S. presidents (Chester A. ArthurGrover ClevelandBenjamin Harrison and Theodore Roosevelt) would join the Thirteen Club’s ranks at one time or another.

Friday the 13th in Pop Culture

An important milestone in the history of the Friday the 13th legend in particular (not just the number 13) occurred in 1907, with the publication of the novel Friday, the Thirteenth written by Thomas William Lawson.

The book told the story of a New York City stockbroker who plays on superstitions about the date to create chaos on Wall Street, and make a killing on the market.

The horror movie Friday the 13th, released in 1980, introduced the world to a hockey mask-wearing killer named Jason, and is perhaps the best-known example of the famous superstition in pop culture history. The movie spawned multiple sequels, as well as comic books, novellas, video games, related merchandise and countless terrifying Halloween costumes.

What bad things happened on Friday 13th?

On Friday, October 13, 1307, officers of King Philip IV of France arrested hundreds of the Knights Templar, a powerful religious and military order formed in the 12th century for the defense of the Holy Land.

Imprisoned on charges of various illegal behaviors (but really because the king wanted access to their financial resources), many Templars were later executed. Some cite the link with the Templars as the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition, but like many legends involving the Templars and their history, the truth remains murky.

In more recent times, a number of traumatic events have occurred on Friday the 13th, including the German bombing of Buckingham Palace (September 1940); the murder of Kitty Genovese in Queens, New York (March 1964); a cyclone that killed more than 300,000 people in Bangladesh (November 1970); the disappearance of a Chilean Air Force plane in the Andes (October 1972); the death of rapper Tupac Shakur (September 1996) and the crash of the Costa Concordia cruise ship off the coast of Italy, which killed 30 people (January 2012).”

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FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate Tools and Solutions Contract Kathy Vetten and Corky Vetten, Realtors. Call us at our Office #828-837-2288 or Cell #828-361-0360 / 828-361-0358 or visit website: http://www.kathyvetten.com or http://www.exitmurphy.com or

http://www.cometomurphync.com

#EXITRealty #Murphync #RealEstate #CometoMurphyNC #BuyaHome #ListYourHome

#Realtors

Thanksgiving 2019 – Murphy, NC

Thanksgiving is tomorrow and it’s time to cook your turkey for your family & friend feast! EXIT Realty Mountain View Properties would like to share some history presented by https://www.history.com/topics/thanksgiving/history-of-thanksgiving   about Thanksgiving!

In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states. It wasn’t until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November.

Thanksgiving at Plymouth

In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World. After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth.Throughout that first brutal winter, most of the colonists remained on board the ship, where they suffered from exposure, scurvy and outbreaks of contagious disease. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived to see their first New England spring. In March, the remaining settlers moved ashore, where they received an astonishing visit from an Abenaki Indian who greeted them in English.

Several days later, he returned with another Native American, Squanto, a member of the Pawtuxet tribe who had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London and returning to his homeland on an exploratory expedition. Squanto taught the Pilgrims, weakened by malnutrition and illness, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants. He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with the Wampanoag, a local tribe, which would endure for more than 50 years and tragically remains one of the sole examples of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans.

Historians have suggested that many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies, cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.

Pilgrims held their second Thanksgiving celebration in 1623 to mark the end of a long drought that had threatened the year’s harvest and prompted Governor Bradford to call for a religious fast. Days of fasting and thanksgiving on an annual or occasional basis became common practice in other New England settlements as well.

During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress designated one or more days of thanksgiving a year, and in 1789 George Washington issued the first Thanksgiving proclamation by the national government of the United States; in it, he called upon Americans to express their gratitude for the happy conclusion to the country’s war of independence and the successful ratification of the U.S. Constitution. His successors John Adams and James Madison also designated days of thanks during their presidencies.

In 1817, New York became the first of several states to officially adopt an annual Thanksgiving holiday; each celebrated it on a different day, however, and the American South remained largely unfamiliar with the tradition.

In 1827, the noted magazine editor and prolific writer Sarah Josepha Hale—author, among countless other things, of the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb”—launched a campaign to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday. For 36 years, she published numerous editorials and sent scores of letters to governors, senators, presidents and other politicians, earning her the nickname the “Mother of Thanksgiving.”

For the rest of the article please visit https://www.history.com/topics/thanksgiving/history-of-thanksgiving 

 

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FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate Tools and Solutions Contract Kathy Vetten and Corky Vetten, Realtors. Call us at our Office #828-837-2288 or Cell #828-361-0360 / 828-361-0358 or visit website: http://www.kathyvetten.com or http://www.exitmurphy.com or

 http://www.cometomurphync.com

#EXITRealty #Murphync #RealEstate #CometoMurphyNC #BuyaHome #ListYourHome

#Realtors

115 Sawyers Cove – Murphy, NC

PRICE REDUCTION!! HOME FOR SALE, Murphy NC

Fiber Optic Internet, Hand Hewn Log Sided Cabin in Private Wooded Setting,Large Open Great Room Concept with 1 Bedroom / 1 Bath with an Open Loft, Metal Roof, Full Back Porch, Additional Adjoining Property Negotiable with Contract, Beautiful Maintained & Finished with Acid Wash Colored Flooring or Builder will give allowance & install New Flooring, Custom Wood Cabinetry with Granite Counter Tops, Tongue & Groove Wood Ceilings, Dry Wall Interior, Builder owned Home. Underground Utilities, Fiber Optic Internet, Convenient to downtown Murphy / Downtown Blue Ridge Georgia & Tennessee Line. Great Opportunity for Full Time or Vacation Home. Seller is asking $124,900 Make Offer.

This home is located near the Nantahala White Water Rafting, The Ocoee White Water Rafting, Lake Hiawassee for Boating /Fishing / Skiing & Swimming. Also, convenient to John C Campbell Folks School for Arts & Crafts, Downtown Murphy NC, GA State Line, &  TN State Line.

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FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate Tools and Solutions Contract Kathy Vetten and Corky Vetten, Realtors. Call us at our Office #828-837-2288 or Cell #828-361-0360 / 828-361-0358 or visit website: http://www.kathyvetten.com or http://www.exitmurphy.com or

 http://www.cometomurphync.com

#EXITRealty #Murphync #RealEstate #CometoMurphyNC #BuyaHome #ListYourHome

#Realtors

History of Black Friday – Murphy, NC

Black Friday – Murphy, NC

EXIT Realty Mountain View Properties would like to help inform you on The History of Black Friday and it is presented by https://www.history.com/news/whats-the-real-history-of-black-friday

Did you know?

The term “Black Friday” wasn’t used first for a holiday of shopping, but for financial crisis; specifically, the crash of the U.S gold market on September 24th in 1869. Two wall street financiers bought up as much as they could of the nation’s gold, as they hoped to drive prices through the roof and sell it for a big profit, these two financiers names were Jay Gould and Jim Fisk. On that Friday in September, their conspiracy unraveled, which sent the stock market into free-fall and bankrupting everyone in Wall Street.

The most commonly repeated story behind the post-Thanksgiving shopping-related Black Friday tradition links it to retailers. As the story goes, after an entire year of operating at a loss (“in the red”) stores would supposedly earn a profit (“went into the black”) on the day after Thanksgiving, because holiday shoppers blew so much money on discounted merchandise. Though it’s true that retail companies used to record losses in red and profits in black when doing their accounting, this version of Black Friday’s origin is the officially sanctioned—but inaccurate—story behind the tradition.

In recent years, another myth has surfaced that gives a particularly ugly twist to the tradition, claiming that back in the 1800’s Southern plantation owners could buy slaves at a discount on the day after Thanksgiving. Though this version of Black Friday’s roots has understandably led some to call for a boycott of the retail holiday, it has no basis in fact.

The true story behind Black Friday, however, is not as sunny as retailers might have you believe. Back in the 1950’s, police in the city of Philadelphia used the term to describe the chaos that ensued on the day after Thanksgiving, when hordes of suburban shoppers and tourists flooded into the city in advance of the big Army-Navy football game held on that Saturday every year. Not only would Philly cops not be able to take the day off, but they would have to work extra-long shifts dealing with the additional crowds and traffic. Shoplifters would also take advantage of the bedlam in stores to make off with merchandise, adding to the law enforcement headache.

By 1961, “Black Friday” had caught on in Philadelphia, to the extent that the city’s merchants and boosters tried unsuccessfully to change it to “Big Friday” in order to remove the negative connotations. The term didn’t spread to the rest of the country until much later, however, and as recently as 1985 it wasn’t in common use nationwide. Sometime in the late 1980’s, however, retailers found a way to reinvent Black Friday and turn it into something that reflected positively, rather than negatively, on them and their customers. The result was the “red to black” concept of the holiday mentioned earlier, and the notion that the day after Thanksgiving marked the occasion when America’s stores finally turned a profit. (In fact, stores traditionally see bigger sales on the Saturday before Christmas.)

The Black Friday story stuck, and pretty soon the term’s darker roots in Philadelphia were largely forgotten. Since then, the one-day sales bonanza has morphed into a four-day event, and spawned other “retail holidays” such as Small Business Saturday/Sunday and Cyber Monday. Stores started opening earlier and earlier on that Friday, and now the most dedicated shoppers can head out right after their Thanksgiving meal. According to a pre-holiday survey this year by the National Retail Federation, an estimated 135.8 million Americans definitely plan to shop over the Thanksgiving weekend (58.7 percent of those surveyed), though even more (183.8 million, or 79.6 percent) said they would or might take advantage of the online deals offered on Cyber Monday.

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FOR ALL YOUR Real Estate Tools and Solutions Contract Kathy Vetten and Corky Vetten, Realtors. Call us at our Office #828-837-2288 or Cell #828-361-0360 / 828-361-0358 or visit website: http://www.kathyvetten.com or http://www.exitmurphy.com or

 http://www.cometomurphync.com

#EXITRealty #Murphync #RealEstate #CometoMurphyNC #BuyaHome #ListYourHome

#Realtors